Authortapasonline
RatingDifficultyBeginner

Galician ("fairgound") octopus - also known as Pulpo a la Gallega, this is a traditional dish from the region of Galicia in northern Spain. Traditionally, the octopus is tenderized by banging against a stone, but this is more easily accomplished by freezing it. The potatoes are the usual accompaniment, but sometimes the octopus is served on its own.

Yields4 Servings
Prep Time10 minsCook Time50 minsTotal Time1 hr
 1 Whole Octopus, around 2k
 500 g small to medium-sized Potatoespeeled
 Sea Salt Flakes
 Pimentón Dulce (smoked paprika)
 Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1

If using frozen octopus, allow it to defrost in the 'fridge. Clean thoroughly, removing the eyes and mouth, and wash well.

2

Fill a large stockpot with water and bring it to the boil. "Scare" the octopus by grabbing the head and dipping it in and out of the water three times. This will ensure that the skin does not fall off whilst cooking.

3

Place the octopus in the pan, ensuring there is enough water to cover, return to the boil, then cook on a medium heat for around thirty minutes. Check for tenderness with a skewer or point of a knife. Octopus is like squid and can be tough if either over or under cooked.

4

Remove the octopus when ready and set aside. In the same water, cook the potatoes for about fifteen minutes until tender.

5

Drain the potatoes and allow to cool slightly, then slice them and place them on the plate. Traditionally, a wooden plate is used - these are available from specialist suppliers.

6

With kitchen scissors, cut the octopus into approximately 1cm pieces and place on top of the potatoes. Sprinkle with pimentón and sea salt flakes and drizzle with olive oil.

Category, Cooking Method,

Ingredients

 1 Whole Octopus, around 2k
 500 g small to medium-sized Potatoespeeled
 Sea Salt Flakes
 Pimentón Dulce (smoked paprika)
 Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Directions

1

If using frozen octopus, allow it to defrost in the 'fridge. Clean thoroughly, removing the eyes and mouth, and wash well.

2

Fill a large stockpot with water and bring it to the boil. "Scare" the octopus by grabbing the head and dipping it in and out of the water three times. This will ensure that the skin does not fall off whilst cooking.

3

Place the octopus in the pan, ensuring there is enough water to cover, return to the boil, then cook on a medium heat for around thirty minutes. Check for tenderness with a skewer or point of a knife. Octopus is like squid and can be tough if either over or under cooked.

4

Remove the octopus when ready and set aside. In the same water, cook the potatoes for about fifteen minutes until tender.

5

Drain the potatoes and allow to cool slightly, then slice them and place them on the plate. Traditionally, a wooden plate is used - these are available from specialist suppliers.

6

With kitchen scissors, cut the octopus into approximately 1cm pieces and place on top of the potatoes. Sprinkle with pimentón and sea salt flakes and drizzle with olive oil.

Pulpo a la Feria